Category Archives: Irish Tourist

Druid Chair


In the town land of Ballybrack (An Baile Breac) to the south east of Dublin city, is a well preserved portal tomb, located 100m north of the Loughlinstown River and 1km east of Dublin Bay and the Irish Sea. It is sited on a small green in the middle of a modern housing estate; 20m from a busy road and in the local area is known as “Cromlech Fields” and is marked on the OSI map as “Dolmen” and on the historic map as “Cromlech”. During construction of the houses, a small scale excavation was undertaken to determine the extent of the site but no artifacts were uncovered. Its huge capstone has an estimated weight of 40 metric tons and has an almost polished underside. The tomb entrance faces east, with the pair of portal stones measuring between 1.55m and 1.4m in height and the impressive capstone measures 2.2m in length, 2.05m in width and 1.2m in depth. There is no door stone remaining and the
back of the capstone rests directly on the ground surface.

Giant’s Causeway

giants-causeway

The Giant’s Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. It is also known as Clochán an Aifir or Clochán na bhFomhórach in Irish and tha Giant’s Causey in Ulster-Scots.

It is located in County Antrim on the northeast coast of Northern Ireland, about three miles (4.8 km) northeast of the town of Bushmills. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986, and a national nature reserve in 1987 by the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, the Giant’s Causeway was named as the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom. The tops of the columns form stepping stones that lead from the cliff foot and disappear under the sea. Most of the columns are hexagonal, although there are also some with four, five, seven or eight sides. The tallest are about 12 metres (39 ft) high, and the solidified lava in the cliffs is 28 metres (92 ft) thick in places.

Much of the Giant’s Causeway and Causeway Coast World Heritage Site is today owned and managed by the National Trust and it is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Northern Ireland. The remainder of the site is owned by the Crown Estate and a number of private landowners.

Dream Island For Sale

Dornish Island

This 19-acre island is located in Clew Bay, Co Mayo and offers stunning views.

One of its former owners is legendary singer John Lennon, who purchased it in 1967.

His wife Yoko Ono sold it after the Beatles man’s tragic death to its current owners.

The island also homed marine pilots in the 1880s, who used to guide ships into Westport harbour.

Dream Castle for Sale

Glin Castle

Glin Castle is a romantic castellated mansion enjoying a glorious setting within some 380 acres of mature parkland and benefiting from being superbly positioned overlooking the Shannon estuary, on the periphery of attractive Glin village and less than 1 hour’s drive of Limerick city centre and Shannon International airport.

This is one of Ireland’s most historic properties Glin Castle has been in the FitzGerald family, hereditary Knights of Glin, for over 700 years. The romantic and fairytale title of the Knight of Glin dates back to the early 13th Century. The title is an anomaly, akin to Irish chieftainships, and illustrates the Gaelicization of a powerful Norman family. In spite of the usual series of massacres, attainders, and confiscations, the Knights of the Glen, or Valley, have somehow managed to retain their lands at Glin for over seven centuries.

Saint Patricks Day

Slainte
Slainte
Saint Patrick’s Day, or the Feast of Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, “the Day of the Festival of Patrick”), is a cultural and religious celebration held on 17 March, the traditional death date of Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461), the foremost patron saint of Ireland.

Saint Patrick’s Day was made an official Christian feast day in the early 17th century and is observed by the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion (especially the Church of Ireland), the Eastern Orthodox Church and Lutheran Church. The day commemorates Saint Patrick and the arrival of Christianity in Ireland, as well as celebrating the heritage and culture of the Irish in general. Celebrations generally involve public parades and festivals, céilithe, and the wearing of green attire or shamrocks. Christians also attend church services, and the Lenten restrictions on eating and drinking alcohol are lifted for the day, which has encouraged and propagated the holiday’s tradition of alcohol consumption.

Saint Patrick’s Day is a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the British Overseas Territory of Montserrat. It is also widely celebrated by the Irish diaspora around the world; especially in Great Britain, Canada, the United States, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand.

10 reasons women love men in kilts

1. Nothing flatters muscles like a kilt.

2. Or the legs for that matter.

3. A kilt flatters for all occasions—running, jumping, fighting, even getting married !

4. It’s what a warrior wears.

5. And what a lover wears.

6. Men in kilts make the best romance novel covers !

7. Gerard Butler. Nuff said.

8. The Tenth Doctor wears one.

9. So does Fox Mulder.

10. Heck, even Chuck Bass wears one.

21 reasons you should move to IRELAND immediately.

1. The craic.

(Picture: Flickr/Michael Foley)

(Picture: Flickr/Michael Foley)

Or mighty! Loosely translated means the fun factor is tipping the scales and it’s true, particularly if you happen to be in a pub during a lock-in.

2. Because of the tea

cup of tea

(Picture: Flickr/*Ann Gordon)

When not drinking Guinness, Ireland sups a lot of tea. Who doesn’t love a cup of cha?

3. Because of the language

Irish language

(Picture: Flickr/Larry Sheradon)

Come here till I tell ya, you don’t have to speak in Gaeilge, even everyday language is made beautiful by an Irish brogue and a novel approach. Take the phrase ‘acting the maggot’ which means messing around – it’s so much better than ‘messing around’!

4. Because of the people

(Picture: Flickr/LenDog64)

(Picture: Flickr/LenDog64)

The Irish are some of the funniest and warmest people you’ll ever meet. After famines, Cromwell and the banking crises they still know how to see the funny side.

5. Because of their names

(Picture: Flickr/Free Education for Everyone)

(Picture: Flickr/Free Education for Everyone)

With as many pronunciations as there are different spellings, Irish names are like music to your ears: Ailbhe, Bláithín, Caolán, Dara, Daire or Darragh?

6. Because of the Irish men

(Picture: Flickr/Tim Ngo)

(Picture: Flickr/Tim Ngo)

Colin Farrell, Ronan Keating, Niall Horan!

7. Because of the Rose of Tralee

(Picture: Flickr/morgraene)

(Picture: Flickr/morgraene)

Or beours (beautiful women), as they might also be known. If you thought Father Ted’s Lovely Girls competition was a comic invention you’d be wrong, it happens here every year at the Rose of Tralee.

8. Because of the mammies

(Picture: Flickr/Anthony Beal)

(Picture: Flickr/Anthony Beal)

They’re famous for being able to scold and praise you in one breath. They’ll make sure you’re well fed, and you always wear your coat in wet weather, but cross one at your peril.

9. Because of the dinners

(Picture: Flickr/Jason Crane)

(Picture: Flickr/Jason Crane)

Irish mammies are particularly good at these. Cabbage, ham and spuds are a staple. Basically anything with potatoes really!

10. Because of the pubs

(Picture: Flickr/Frédéric Poirot)

(Picture: Flickr/Frédéric Poirot)

Where everyone is always welcome – to stay till tomorrow if they want, ah go on, the craic’ll be mighty!

11. Because of the scenery

(Picture: Flickr/Robert Cross)

(Picture: Flickr/Robert Cross)

Take a trip to Glendalough where you can see historic ruins of a medieval monastery, plus walk round a lough that looks like something out of Lord of the Rings.

12. Because of the weather

(Picture: Flickr/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

(Picture: Flickr/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Yeah it rains a lot, but that’s what makes it the Emerald Isle. It’s green as far as the eye can see.

13. Because of the sport

(Picture: Flickr/Brendan Rankin)

(Picture: Flickr/Brendan Rankin)

Being in the GAA (Gaelic Athletic Association) is like being in a tribe. Even the Queen is a fan of hurling, the world’s fastest field sport.

14. Because of the cities

(Picture: Flickr/darren webb)

(Picture: Flickr/darren webb)

Dublin, Cork, Galway, each of Ireland’s cities is like one big party that everyone’s been invited to.

Walk down cobbled streets in Kilkenny or pop into a pub in Galway where there will always be live music or pretend your Bono and stalk the streets of Dublin.

15. Because of the music

(Picture: Flickr/Stephane Rossignol)

(Picture: Flickr/Stephane Rossignol)

Talking of Bono, one of Ireland’s biggest exports is its musicians. There’s just so many of them and all seem to have been born with a cajon in their hands.

16. Because of Jedward

BOREHAMWOOD, ENGLAND - AUGUST 18:  John and Edward Grimes also know as Jedward arrive as a guests in the Big Brother House at Elstree Studios on August 18, 2011 in Borehamwood, England.  (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

(Picture: Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Yeah, they’re not to everyone’s taste but they’ve brought us all a laugh, even if for the wrong reasons.

17. Because of the comedy

(Picture: Flickr/Isabelle)

(Picture: Flickr/Isabelle)

Dylan Moran, Tommy Tiernan, Ardal O’Hanlon, Graham Linehan, Pat Short, we could go on (for a really long time!)

18. Because of the books

(Picture: Flickr/electrictuesday)

(Picture: Flickr/electrictuesday)

From Marian Keyes to James Joyce, Ireland is home to the literary greats.

19. Because of the culture

(Picture: Flickr/Terry Ballard)

(Picture: Flickr/Terry Ballard)

Oscar Wild, the music, Ballykissangel! Why not pop into Fitzgerald’s and pretend your Father Peter!

20. Because of the magic…

(Picture: Flickr/Azzurra Ambrosi)

(Picture: Flickr/Azzurra Ambrosi)

Did someone say Leprechaun? Careful down country roads at night in case you meet a will-o’-the-wisp, faeries or a banshee (bean-sidhe).

21. Because it’s grand

(Picture: Flickr/Bhautik Joshi)

(Picture: Flickr/Bhautik Joshi)

Even Saint Patrick said so, what other reason could you need?

Dursey Island Cable Car

Dursey Island lies at the southwestern tip of the Beara Peninsula in the west of County Cork in Ireland. Dursey Island is 6.5 km long and 1.5 km wide. The island is separated from the mainland by a narrow stretch of water called Dursey Sound which has a very strong tidal race, with the submerged Flag Rock close to the centre of the channel. The island has just six or so permanent wintertime residents, and is connected to the mainland by Ireland’s only cable car. Dursey has no shops, pubs or restaurants.

cropped-durseycablecar.jpg
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Round Ireland in a Mini

We know that Irish people love to tell Tourists about how beautiful a country we live in but to be honest we actually are fairly gorgeous and these lads from Cork have reminded us about some of the best spots on the island.

The boys set off on a four day road-trip around the country starting in the Rebel County, heading up the west coast, up north to Malin Head, back down to Dublin and cutting through the midlands to get back to Leeside.

cropped-ireland9.jpg
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